John Lawrence "Larry" Stewart

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Obituary


JOHN "LARRY" LAWRENCE STEWART
April 19, 1925 ~ April 6, 2017

Dr. John Lawrence "Larry" Stewart of Vancouver, WA, died peacefully while in hospice care on April 6, 2017.

Larry was born to John Percy and Edith (Lichty) Stewart in 1925 in Pasadena, CA. In 1944, at the age 18, he enlisted in the Army Air Corps and became an aerial navigator and joined forces with his B-24 crew. After the war he left with an honorable discharge and the rank of first lieutenant. He later attended Pasadena City College, followed by a BS, MS, and then a PhD degree in Electrical Engineering from Stanford University.

Larry's career moves landed him positions as Associate Professor at the University of Michigan, then Cal-Tech, then later as full professor at the University of Arizona. He started a company which he eventually moved to the Silicon Valley in 1963. Work involved research and development in bionics technologies for the U.S. Air Force and other Defense Agencies.

In 1982 he moved operations and the family to Eugene, OR. With his sons, he formed a company that produced software and hardware for audio, speech synthesis, and voice recognition for personal computers. He retired to Vancouver, WA in 1991.

Over his career he wrote several graduate-level textbooks and technical trade articles. He holds 14 patents related to advanced signal processing methods.

All those who knew Larry showed him great admiration and affection. He enjoyed SCUBA diving, hiking, and flying small personal and experimental airplanes.

Larry is survived by his wife of 65 years, Rita; his two sons, Brad and Mark of Eugene, OR; and three grandchildren.

His remains will be placed at the Willamette National Cemetery in Portland, OR. A private service with full military honors will be held for the family.
Please sign Larry's Guest Book at www.columbian.com/obits.
Published in The Columbian on Apr. 16, 2017
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