Agnes "Aggie" Johnson

Obituary
  • "Mun kanteleeni kauniimmin Taivaassa kerran soi, siel uusin..."
    - Pirjo Halme
  • "Mun kanteleeni kauniimmin Taivaassa kerran soi,siel uusin..."
    - Pirjo Halme
  • "I will always remember Aggie, singing joyfully around the..."
    - Dorothy Conner-Shepard


AGNES KARVONEN JOHNSON
June 29, 1928 ~ September 20, 2017

Agnes "Aggie" Johnson, 89, died peacefully September 20, 2017 at the home of her son Paul, where she spent her last days, cared for lovingly by the family. She was born June 29, 1928, in Calumet, Michigan, to John and Mary Levanen.
In June 1951, she married Rudy Karvonen. They came to the West, settling here and raising their 7 children, all of whom still live in the Battle Ground area. Daughters: Susan with Pekka Halme, Julie with Steve Nylund, Kristine with Wardy Johnson, and Mary with Henry Johansson. Sons: Kent with Ellen, John with Alice, and Paul with Tricia Karvonen. ~ Two infant daughters, Jan and Joy were born with John, as triplets, in 1961, but died very soon after birth from complications.
After 36 years of marriage, Rudy passed away in 1988. Seven years later she married Earl Johnson. From her marriage to Earl, she gained 6 grown step-children and their families: Randy Johnson, Pam Muonio of Duluth, MN, Sue Downing (now deceased), Debbie Danforth, Missy Williamson, and Matt Johnson. Earl passed away in 2009.
She had 55 grandchildren and 120 great-grandchildren.
Aggie had unwavering faith in the Living Christianity and loved to visit with her Christian friends and travel.
Preceding her in death were her parents, her husbands, Rudy and Earl, her two infant daughters, and her ten siblings: Elsa Tonjum, Martin Levanen, Lavey "Butch" Levanen, Denny Levanen, Sulo Levanen, Esther Tapani, Helen Ek, Edward Levanen, Alice Ek, and Raymond Levanen.
Funeral services will be held Tuesday, September 26, 2017, at 1:00 p.m. at the Old Apostolic Lutheran Church of Brush Prairie. All are welcome.
Please sign her guest book at: www.columbian.com/obits.

logo

Published in The Columbian on Sept. 26, 2017